Clifford Law Offices PC
Get Your Free Case Review
312-899-9090
Main Menu Email Us

August 2013 Archives

Distracted Driving -- Working for an EndDD

National Movement Targets Distracted Driving EndDD was started in memory of Casey Feldman, a 21-year-old college student killed by a distracted driver. Casey's story inspired hundreds of trial lawyers to fan out and speak to more than 75,000 teens (and counting) about how they can help end distracted driving.

Lawyers at Clifford Law Offices Meet with Editor and Publisher of Law Bulletin

Robert Clifford, senior partner at Clifford Law Offices (right) speaks to Pat Milhizer, Editor in Chief of the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin and the Chicago Lawyer (second from right), and Mike Kramer, publisher of the Law Bulletin Publishing Company (third from right) along with a number of lawyers at the firm.  They discussed issues impacting the reporting of cases and legal events.

Learn What you can do if you are a Victim of Complications from Essure, a Female Sterilization Product

Women Spread Word About Problems With Essure Women who suffer serious complications from an implantable birth-control device called Essure want others to think twice before undergoing the procedure. So they launched a Facebook page, YouTube channel, website and enlisted Erin Brockovich to tell their stories. 

American Association of Justice Discusses a Supreme Court Decision That Allows Manufacturers Not to be Held Accountable for Unsafe Medical Products

0% at Fault  A 2008 Supreme Court ruling held that the makers of FDA-approved medical devices can't be held responsible for injuries, even if their product is defective and later recalled. Source: Unequal Harm, American Association for Justice 

Important Statistics on Safe Boating

By the numbers/ 12,000 Lakes - Minnesota is the "land of 12,000 lakes" rather than the 10,000 lakes promoted on its license plates, with more shoreline than California, Hawaii and Florida combined! Source: Sky Blue Water, Minnesota North Star 709 Deaths - Boat accidents nationwide killed 709 Americans in 2008, 12 in Minnesota alone. The vast majority of the victims - 90% - drowned and were not wearing a life jacket at the time of the accident. Source: Boating Safety Resource Center, U.S. Coast Guard 1 per Person - The number of readily accessible, Coast Guard-approved life jackets per passenger you must have on board your boat. Source: Boating, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Float Through Summer Safely

Boating and Personal Watercraft Basics Boating mishaps throughout the country have dropped steadily in the past decade, from 8,026 accidents and 4,442 injuries in 1996 to 4,789 accidents and 3,331 injuries in 2008, according to Recreational Boating Statistics 2008 from the U.S. Coast Guard [download report]. Unfortunately, the number of deaths has remained steady, between 700 and 800 per year. With July traditionally the worst month for boating accidents, here is a summary of rules, regulations and safety tips from the Department of Natural Resources'Minnesota Boating Guide 2010. Visit the Boat & Water Safety home page online or download the brochure for more detail. Required Equipment

Laser Toys: Not Always Child's Play

When operated unsafely, or without certain controls, the highly-concentrated light from lasers, even those in toys, can be dangerous, causing serious eye injuries and even blindness. FDA has issued draft guidance on the safety of toy laser products to protect children from harm. Read this Consumer Update to learn more about why laser toys can pose a danger to kids.

Some Helpful Tips on Explosions and Who You Can Contact

Follow a two-part strategy to prevent gasoline can fires or explosions. First, seriously consider buying a gas can with a flame arrester. Often called "safety cans," these containers are normally made of metal rather than plastic. Many feature a spring-loaded cap that closes automatically. Major manufacturers of safety cans include Eagle and Justrite, and prices range from $35 to $75 depending on the size of the can. No-Spill also makes a plastic gas can with a flame arrester. Second, never forget how dangerous it is to use or store gasoline. Review these safety tips: Around children ...

Plastic Gas Cans: Children Are Hurt in 40 Percent of Documented Explosions

Three-year-old Landon Beadore was mom’s official little helper, according to his dad, Paul. One of his duties was to pick up toys before his mom mowed the yard. “He was putting his sister’s bike in the cellar when he accidentally tips over the gas can,” recalls his dad. “Vapors from the gas can went along the cellar floor. There was an ignition and the fire occurred.” Landon was burned over 47 percent of his body. “I couldn't move. I couldn’t move,” he later told his dad. His shoes and feet had melted into the floor.Experts and lawyers in Landon’s case and dozens more involving 75 reported burn victims – nearly 40 percent of them children – believe that a small part called a flame arrester, costing less than $1, could have prevented these horrific injuries. Even more disturbing, they say, is that despite ample evidence that these plastic containers are more prone to explosions, manufacturers and the government watchdog Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) haven’t acted to install arresters or warned consumers of the defect. Ironically, flame arresters are required by the Occupational Safety and Health Care Administration (OSHA) in workplace gas cans.As far back as 1973, Consumer Reports magazine wrote: “Should fumes outside the gas can ignite as you pour or fill, a flashback fire is possible that could ignite the contents of the can itself. Such accidents can be prevented by a flame arrester, which we think should be legally required in all openings like these.”

Flaw in Gas Can Design Can Cause Explosions and Serious Injuries

Three-year-old Landon Beadore was helping his mom pick up toys when he knocked over a plastic gas can just like the one pictured here. The pilot light on a nearby water heater ignited the gas fumes, which flashed back to the nozzle on the gas can, turning it into a firebomb. Landon's horrible experience has been repeated more than 75 times throughout the country, burning and killing children, teenagers and adults. Many of these injuries might have been prevented with a part costing less than $1 called a flame arrester. You Should Know more about gas cans and how to prevent injuries to your loved ones.

Latch-Key Kids -- When Does it Amount to Child Endangerment when Leaving Them Unsupervised?

Question: If my children get home from school before I get home, could I face charges of child endangerment for leaving them unsupervised?Answer: In general, federal and state laws let parents care for their children as they see fit. Sometimes, however, criminal and child welfare laws allow the state to step in. In Illinois, there are a number of factors, such as the age of the child, which the law takes into consideration to determine if a child has been left alone for an unreasonable amount of time. Parents who leave their children unattended for long periods may face criminal charges and/or the possibility of having the children removed from the home and placed in state care. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Immigration Assistance Services in Illinois -- Find out More Information from the Illinois State Bar Association

Question: Who can legally provide immigration assistance services in the state of Illinois?Answer: Licensed attorneys, registered representatives from a nonprofit organization, and others who have been recognized by the Board of Immigration Appeals as a registered provider can offer immigration services. Those who provide the services must comply with specific rules to avoid committing fraud. Further information is available by clicking here. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Traffic Citations -- Can They Be Handled Outside of Court? The Illinois State Bar Weighs In

Question: Am I able to handle a traffic violation outside of court?Answer: Some traffic violations can be settled before they reach the court. In those instances, the defendant typically admits guilt and agrees to pay the fine. However, a defendant who chooses this approach is more likely to receive a conviction on his or her driving record. An appearance in court, with an attorney at your side, may enable you to work out a plea without it impacting your driving record.  For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Visitation Rights of Parents Involved in a Divorce

Question: Is there a law requiring me to give my ex-spouse visitation rights for our children?Answer: Generally, the courts give visitation rights to both spouses. Unless you can establish to the satisfaction of the court that your ex-spouse may flee with or harm the child, chances are the court will grant visitation rights.  For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Legal Advice on the Internet -- Is it Reliable?

Question: How much trust can I place on legal advice offered on the Internet?Answer: A growing number of consumers seek legal advice on the Internet, but some advice may be misleading or completely inaccurate. Except for matters governed by federal law, such as bankruptcy and federal tax issues, state laws frequently differ from one state to the next. When you need legal advice, it is best to seek the counsel of an experienced lawyer. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Importance of Developing an Estate Plan -- When is it Best to do it?

Question: When should I consider developing an estate plan?Answer: Estate planning isn’t just for wealthier individuals but for anyone who is concerned about what happens to their healthcare, family and property after passing. If you don’t make those decisions now, the courts will decide for you later. A lawyer can help you prepare an estate plan, a will, durable power of attorney and other related documents. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Homebrewers Now Allowed in Illinois; State Bar Association Explains Limitations

Question: I’m hopped up about a new Illinois law that expands the rights of homebrewers. Does this mean I’ll be able to sell my homemade brew in public places?Answer: Illinois homebrewers can now legally share their brew with friends, family and other homebrew groups as long as they do not receive compensation for it. The homemade beers can also be legally entered into festivals and competitions. A special permit must be obtained if the beer is offered at a festival, and no more than three 2-ounce samples can be given to a consumer. The law places limits on how much beer a homebrewer can produce in a given year. Other restrictions apply. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

When Buying a Foreclosed Property With FHA-Insured Home Loan, Be Sure to Know the Rules

Question: We are about to purchase a foreclosed property with an FHA-insured home loan. Can the loan also be used to make repairs?Answer: Homebuyers who purchase a foreclosed home, and who need financing for repairs and renovations, may find relief in the Federal Housing Administration’s home loan program. A 203(k) Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance Program loan allows borrowers to include the cost of repairs and improvements into their home financing. However, these loans also come with restrictions. The loans are limited to owners/occupants. Also, a licensed contractor must be used to perform the work. The work must begin within 30 days of closing and be completed within six months thereafter. A real estate attorney can provide further details and help guide you through the process. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs 

Public School Education Still Can Charge Fees -- What to do if you Can't Afford Them

Question: As a single parent with a modest income, do I qualify for a school waiver to avoid paying fees, including textbooks?Answer: The Illinois Constitution states that public school education should be free through the secondary level; however, schools can still charge fees for items such as registration, books, and school breakfasts and lunches. According to the Illinois School Code, school boards should waive all district fees for children whose parents can’t afford to pay them. All schools have a form you can fill out to request that your fees be waived. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs 

Errors on Credit Report? Find Out Who is Responsible from the Illinois State Bar

Question:  Can I sue a credit bureau for failing to correct an error on my credit report?Answer: Credit bureaus report what creditors tell them, so it’s up to you to work things out with the creditor. According to federal law, only a state's attorney general can sue a creditor for furnishing inaccurate information. If the creditor providing information to the credit bureau doesn’t correct the inaccuracy permanently within a few months of reporting the error, you may be able to sue for defamation. If it is a case of identity fraud, you may be able to sue for "negligent enablement of identity fraud." An attorney can help determine whether you have a case. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com. If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Making out a Will? A Free Informational Brochure Offered by the ISBA

Question: Under what circumstances can a will be contested?Answer: A will can be challenged for a number of reasons, including the fact that it was not signed properly before witnesses or that the person making the will did not have the mental capacity to understand what they were signing. Further information about wills and trusts is available in a free brochure by clicking here. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Be Aware of Taxes When you Sell Your Home

Question: Would the sale of my home be subject to capital gains tax?Answer:  If you have owned and occupied your principal residence for more than two years, you may not have to pay this tax. An experienced attorney can help you understand tax problems that may occur when your home is sold. He or she will also make sure that, before signing, you understand all legal agreements related to the sale of your home. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Small Claims Court -- The ISBA Offers Some Pointers

Question: If I use small claims court to settle my case, can I bring along an attorney?Answer: While a lawyer in small claims court isn’t required, your chances of winning a case may improve if you hire an attorney. Be aware that small claims court may be used only for certain types of cases, such as breach of contract, property damage, a personal injury, evictions or repossession of property. The maximum judgment allowed in small claims court is $10,000, plus costs. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Starting a Business in Your Home? Be Sure to Check Local Zoning Laws

Question: I plan to start a home-based business. What should I know about local zoning laws?Answer: Before you decide to use that kitchen table or spare room for business, check local zoning laws for any restrictions. Some laws prohibit all businesses from operating in a residential area. Others have exceptions and take into consideration issues such as whether the business type will be a nuisance to other nearby home owners. A local land use attorney can walk you through the process to ensure you are compliant. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Joint Custody Agreements -- The Child Always Comes First

Question: What issues do state courts take into consideration before providing joint custody of children to a divorcing couple?Answer: In determining whether joint custody is appropriate, a judge will consider factors relevant to the best interests of the child such as each parent’s living accommodations. If the parents are awarded joint custody, they must sign a Joint Parenting Agreement, which explains each parent’s rights and responsibilities for the care of the child. For further information, consult a family lawyer. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Don't Throw Away Those Old Electronic Devices -- How to Legally Dispose of Them

Question: Which electronic devices must legally be recycled or reused?Answer: Tossing electronic devices in the trash or at the curb is illegal. The Illinois Electronic Products Recycling & Reuse Act establishes a statewide system for recycling and/or reusing certain items discarded from residences by requiring electronic manufacturers to participate in the management of discarded electronic products. Those items which are covered by the law are the following: televisions, monitors, printers, computers (laptop, notebook, netbook, tablet, desktop), electronic keyboards, facsimile machines, videocassette recorders, portable digital music players, digital video disc players, video game consoles, small scale servers, scanners, electronic mice, digital converter boxes, cable receivers, satellite receivers, and digital video disc recorders.The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has a list of registered collectors, recyclers and refurbishers on their site at http://bit.ly/9sJsIr.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com.  If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

New Illinois Law on Educating Students about Sexual Assault and Abuse

Question: Are there laws on the books mandating that schools educate students about sexual assault and abuse?Answer: Under a new state law, schools must now implement an age-appropriate sexual assault and abuse awareness and prevention curriculum for grades pre-kindergarten through 12. Previously, the law applied only to secondary schools. The law also requires teachers to participate in professional development and training classes that cover sexual assault and abuse. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Illinois Speed Limit Increase: More Fatalities? Part 2

This blog is intended as a follow-up to our previous blog posted on June 18th entitled "Illinois Speed Limit Increase: More Fatalities?" regarding Illinois Governor Pat Quinn having not yet approved the bill to raise the Illinois speed limit on non-urban interstate highways from 65 mph to 75 mph. Mr. Steve Doner, Former Illinois State Chapter Coordinator for the National Motorist Association, would like to respond with an alternative opinion as outlined in the following published articles: Naperville Sun Daily Herald The State Journal-Register

When Pets Constitute a Medical Reason in a Condo Building -- Hear what the Illinois State Bar Says

Question: My condominium rules prohibit unit owners from keeping pets unless they are service animals or for medical reasons. What constitutes a “medical reason?”Answer: Under the Federal Fair Housing Amendments Act, condominium boards must allow a reasonable accommodation for trained service animals or emotional support animals. While emotional support animals don't have to be trained, an applicant – in order to keep one in his or her unit – typically must show proof of a mental impairment that substantially limits his or her major life activities. Often this requires a written statement from a mental health professional. For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Are Written Employment Contracts Necessary? The Illinois State Bar Offers Some Tips

Question: I am about to join a new company in a management position.  Should I insist that my employer provide me with a written contract?Answer: An employer is under no obligation to provide a written contract to an employee. Most employment relationships are based on an oral agreement. However, if you do not have a written contract, your employer can fire you at any time for any reason without advance warning.There are exceptions. An employer may not fire or discriminate against you based on race, sex, color, disability, religion, etc. or because you made a complaint about the employer to a government agency. Furthermore, a written contract may put additional limits on the employer's ability to fire you.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.llinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Think Before You Park in a Handicapped Spot to Which You Aren't Entitled; the Illinois State Bar Explains Why

Question: What fines can people now expect to pay for violating laws related to handicap parking spaces?Answer: Fines in Illinois for those who illegally use handicap parking plates or decals have increased in 2013 to $600 from $500. Those caught making counterfeit placards will see their fines increase to $1,000. Punishment is even stiffer for those who use handicap plates of those who have died: fines start at $2,500 and come with a mandatory suspension of driving privileges for six months. Doctors who submit false paperwork to help someone get a disabled plate will face a newly-established fine of $1,000.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.llinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Can Your Employer Secretly Run a Credit Check on You? The ISBA Weighs In

Question: Can an employer run a credit check without my permission?Answer: An employer must have your written permission to check personal credit. Know that the prospective employer is supposed to give you a copy of the report and provide you with an opportunity to respond. If you do have a poor credit history, you should be prepared to explain your situation.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Thinking of Adopting? The ISBA Offers a Free Brochure to Help

Question: We are using the Internet to help us search for reputable adoption sources. How can we be sure that a source is legitimate?Answer: The Illinois Adoption Reform Act, which took effect in 2005, was designed to weed out operators that may be engaged in fraudulent and deceptive practices. Experts advise adopting couples to make sure that adoption details, including any costs involved, are clearly spelled out on the website. Adoption agencies should also have accreditation from regulatory bodies or a membership in groups such as the Child Welfare League of America. Be advised that some adoption agency staff members may be paid a commission to persuade prospective adoptive parents to use their service. Further information about adoption is available in a free brochure by clicking here.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

Illinois' New Concealed Gun Law -- the Illinois State Bar Association Offers Important Information

Question: Does Illinois’ new concealed carry gun law mean I can now carry a handgun in public?Answer: Until an application process has been established, concealed carry is still illegal in Illinois. Bear in mind that the new law has restrictions. It will prohibit the carrying of loaded weapons in schools, parks, government facilities, public gathering spots such as parades and festivals, libraries, museums or zoos, public transportation, bars or restaurants where more than half of the business is alcohol sales, and other public places. Several municipalities have already enacted their own ordinances to ban assault weapons, which is allowable under the law.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.com. If you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs

The Need for Credit Insurance, the Illinois State Bar Offers Info

Question: When buying on credit, do I really need to purchase credit insurance?Answer: Having credit insurance means the contract will be paid off if you should become ill or injured and are unable to work, or if you die. The policies are often expensive. Before making a decision, remember that the insurance is entirely voluntary and not required. Some people believe the money would be better spent on a conventional term life or accident insurance policy.For more information about Illinois law, visit www.illinoislawyerfinder.comIf you have a legal question, send it to illinoislawcolumn@isba.org.Illinois Law Now is a series of newspaper and internet posts prepared by the Illinois State Bar Association that address legal issues of interest to the public. For additional information about the law, visit http://www.illinoislawyerfinder.com/legal-faqs  

Privacy Policy | Business Development Solutions by FindLaw, a Thomson Reuters business.